Stanley kubrick essays on his films and legacy

“Stanley Kubrick is one of my all-time favorite filmmakers, and he did me a great honor early in my career that really encouraged me. I was working on The Elephant Man, and I was at Lee International Studios in England, standing in a hallway. One of the producers of The Elephant Man, Jonathan Sanger, brought over some guys who were working with George Lucas and said, “They’ve got a story for you.” And I said, “Okay.” They said, “Yesterday, David, we were at Elstree Studios, and we met Kubrick. And as we were talking to him, he said to us, ‘How would you fellas like to come up to my house tonight and see my favorite film?'” They said, “That would be fantastic.” They went up, and Stanley Kubrick showed them Eraserhead. So, right then, I could have passed away peaceful and happy.”

Matt writes : Legendary French New Wave icon Agnès Varda was honored at the third annual Ebert Tribute ceremony during this year's Toronto International Film Festival. Brian Tallerico covered the event at , while Chaz Ebert assisted in putting together a Roger Favorites entry on Varda, compiling Roger's reviews of the director's work. Roger felt that Varda's 2008 film, "The Beaches of Agnès," contained “the most poetic shot about the cinema” that he had ever seen, in which “two old fishermen, who were young when she first filmed them, watch themselves on a screen” mounted on “an old market cart that they push through the nighttime streets of their village.”

Also, I’m not completely knowledgeable on numerology, but I noticed a lot of 6’s and 666’s throughout the film. The two most notable include the medicine bottle used for the vitamins during Alex’s brainwashing is marked as 114 which adds up to 6. The other instance is after Alex has tried to snuff himself and is in the hospital. The hospitals nurse holds up pictures for Alex with half of a conversation and he is supposed to fill in the other half. One picture the nurse holds up is with two people and a bunch of clocks. Each clock points to 3 PM. There are 6 clocks. When you add two of each clock up together you get 666.

With regard to Welles, it is admittedly a challenge to find something new to say about Citizen Kane , but it is surprising that Kolker does not follow up on his smart analysis of the geometric constructions in early scenes with, for example, some discussion of the shifting triangular compositions during the confrontation at Susan Alexander’s apartment. Welles’s telegraphing of the changing interpersonal balance of power in that scene is a tour de force of visual choreography. The Extraordinary Image is sharper when rising to the defense of some of Welles’s least celebrated efforts, including The Stranger , Mr. Arkadin (1955), and (with an uncommon enthusiasm) The Immortal Story (1969). Better still is Kolker’s assessment of Touch of Evil , and the observation that the film’s greatest long take is not the (marvelous and justly famous) opening shot, but the interrogation scene in Sanchez’s apartment, a scene in which “six to eight people (they come and go) in a crowded space are covered in a shot that lasts about seven minutes,” followed by a “return to the apartment [that] constitutes another long shot of almost five minutes.” Going out on a limb (and I am happy to join him there), Kolker concludes that “ Touch of Evil is amazing in ways that Citizen Kane . . is not.”

Stanley kubrick essays on his films and legacy

stanley kubrick essays on his films and legacy

With regard to Welles, it is admittedly a challenge to find something new to say about Citizen Kane , but it is surprising that Kolker does not follow up on his smart analysis of the geometric constructions in early scenes with, for example, some discussion of the shifting triangular compositions during the confrontation at Susan Alexander’s apartment. Welles’s telegraphing of the changing interpersonal balance of power in that scene is a tour de force of visual choreography. The Extraordinary Image is sharper when rising to the defense of some of Welles’s least celebrated efforts, including The Stranger , Mr. Arkadin (1955), and (with an uncommon enthusiasm) The Immortal Story (1969). Better still is Kolker’s assessment of Touch of Evil , and the observation that the film’s greatest long take is not the (marvelous and justly famous) opening shot, but the interrogation scene in Sanchez’s apartment, a scene in which “six to eight people (they come and go) in a crowded space are covered in a shot that lasts about seven minutes,” followed by a “return to the apartment [that] constitutes another long shot of almost five minutes.” Going out on a limb (and I am happy to join him there), Kolker concludes that “ Touch of Evil is amazing in ways that Citizen Kane . . . is not.”

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