Should animals be used for research thesis statement

Church knew that standard cloning methods wouldn’t work, since bird embryos develop inside shells and no museum specimen of the passenger pigeon (including Martha herself, now in the Smithsonian) would likely contain a fully intact, functional genome. But he could envision a different way of re-creating the bird. Preserved specimens contain fragments of DNA. By piecing together the fragments, scientists can now read the roughly one billion letters in the passenger pigeon genome. Church can’t yet synthesize an entire animal genome from scratch, but he has invented technology that allows him to make sizable chunks of DNA of any sequence he wants. He could theoretically manufacture genes for passenger pigeon traits—a gene for its long tail, for example—and splice them into the genome of a stem cell from a common rock pigeon.

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ZODIAC GOOD/BAD DAYS
MONKEY MISFORTUNE
In the Zodiac, yin-yang dualism is combined with the five elements to obtain ten “alternate” readings for the ten stems ( see above ). In the 60-year cycle of the Zodiac calendar, days and years are further divided into those of great fortune and misfortune, mediocre luck or misfortune, and neutral luck or misfortune. For example, certain Zodiac days of great misfortune in Japan are known as Kōshin days 庚申 (Ch: keng-shen or geng-shen). They occur six times yearly, and once every 60 years, and special rites -- influenced greatly by Chinese Taoist and Zodiac beliefs -- are performed on these days to ward off evil influences. One of the main players is the monkey , for the term Kōshin 庚申 is comprised of two characters -- Kō 庚, the stem associated with metal and the planet Venus, and Shin 申, the ninth symbol of the Chinese zodiac and the character for “monkey.” In Taoist traditions based on the Zodiac calendar, on the eve of a Kōshin Day, three worms (三蟲) believed to dwell in the human body escape from the body and visit the Court of Heaven to report on the sleeping person's sins. Depending on this report, the court might shorten that individual's life. To prevent this, people stayed awake all night on the eve of a Kōshin day, and this practice eventually became known as the Kōshin Machi (Kōshin Vigil, Kōshin Wake, 庚申會). In Japan, such beliefs were recorded by the late Heian era, but became particularly widespread during Japan's Edo period (1600-1868 AD), when people regularly tried to determine auspicious or inauspicious times before beginning activities (such as a new business or marriage). See the Monkey Pages for many more details. 

Yakudoshi 厄年
Text courtesy of Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii http:///
Bad luck ages are referred to as yakudoshi, with yaku meaning “calamity” or “calamitous” and doshi signifying “year(s).” These years are considered critical or dangerous because they are believed to bring bad luck or disaster. For men, the ages 24 and 41 in China (or 25 and 42 in Japan) are deemed critical years, with 41 being especially critical. It is customary in these unlucky years to visit temples and shrines to provide divine protection from harm. The birthday person should wear red to bring good health, vitality and long life. The equivalent yakudoshi ages for women are 18 and 32 (19 and 33 in Japan), with 32 thought to be a particularly hard, terrible or disastrous year. Like the age 41 for men, precautions are taken to ward off bad luck.

Kanreki 還暦
Text courtesy of Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii, http:///
For men, the 60th birthday is called kanreki, the recognition of his “second infancy.” The Japanese characters in the word kanreki literally mean “return” and “calendar.” The traditional calendar, which was based on the Chinese calendar, was organized on 60-year cycles. The cycle of life returns to its starting point in 60 years, and as such, kanreki celebrates that point in a man’s life when his personal calendar has returned to the calendar sign under which he was born. Traditionally, friends and relatives are invited for a celebratory feast on one’s 60th birthday. It is customary for the celebrant to be given a red hood and wear a red vest. These clothes are usually worn by babies and thus symbolize the celebrant’s return to his birth. <end quote from Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii>

Should animals be used for research thesis statement

should animals be used for research thesis statement

ZODIAC GOOD/BAD DAYS
MONKEY MISFORTUNE
In the Zodiac, yin-yang dualism is combined with the five elements to obtain ten “alternate” readings for the ten stems ( see above ). In the 60-year cycle of the Zodiac calendar, days and years are further divided into those of great fortune and misfortune, mediocre luck or misfortune, and neutral luck or misfortune. For example, certain Zodiac days of great misfortune in Japan are known as Kōshin days 庚申 (Ch: keng-shen or geng-shen). They occur six times yearly, and once every 60 years, and special rites -- influenced greatly by Chinese Taoist and Zodiac beliefs -- are performed on these days to ward off evil influences. One of the main players is the monkey , for the term Kōshin 庚申 is comprised of two characters -- Kō 庚, the stem associated with metal and the planet Venus, and Shin 申, the ninth symbol of the Chinese zodiac and the character for “monkey.” In Taoist traditions based on the Zodiac calendar, on the eve of a Kōshin Day, three worms (三蟲) believed to dwell in the human body escape from the body and visit the Court of Heaven to report on the sleeping person's sins. Depending on this report, the court might shorten that individual's life. To prevent this, people stayed awake all night on the eve of a Kōshin day, and this practice eventually became known as the Kōshin Machi (Kōshin Vigil, Kōshin Wake, 庚申會). In Japan, such beliefs were recorded by the late Heian era, but became particularly widespread during Japan's Edo period (1600-1868 AD), when people regularly tried to determine auspicious or inauspicious times before beginning activities (such as a new business or marriage). See the Monkey Pages for many more details. 

Yakudoshi 厄年
Text courtesy of Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii http:///
Bad luck ages are referred to as yakudoshi, with yaku meaning “calamity” or “calamitous” and doshi signifying “year(s).” These years are considered critical or dangerous because they are believed to bring bad luck or disaster. For men, the ages 24 and 41 in China (or 25 and 42 in Japan) are deemed critical years, with 41 being especially critical. It is customary in these unlucky years to visit temples and shrines to provide divine protection from harm. The birthday person should wear red to bring good health, vitality and long life. The equivalent yakudoshi ages for women are 18 and 32 (19 and 33 in Japan), with 32 thought to be a particularly hard, terrible or disastrous year. Like the age 41 for men, precautions are taken to ward off bad luck.

Kanreki 還暦
Text courtesy of Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii, http:///
For men, the 60th birthday is called kanreki, the recognition of his “second infancy.” The Japanese characters in the word kanreki literally mean “return” and “calendar.” The traditional calendar, which was based on the Chinese calendar, was organized on 60-year cycles. The cycle of life returns to its starting point in 60 years, and as such, kanreki celebrates that point in a man’s life when his personal calendar has returned to the calendar sign under which he was born. Traditionally, friends and relatives are invited for a celebratory feast on one’s 60th birthday. It is customary for the celebrant to be given a red hood and wear a red vest. These clothes are usually worn by babies and thus symbolize the celebrant’s return to his birth. <end quote from Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii>

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